What do shirred eggs and celeriac have in common?

Question: What do shirred eggs and celeriac have in common?

Answer: Bron 🙂

Today I learned two new things and Bron taught me about both. One of Bron’s US-based friends mentioned shirred eggs recently in an e-mail. Not being familiar with them, Bron set out to master them this week. Bron has also been preparing for a dinner party in the near future and part of the main meal will be a celeriac mash. I’ve eaten celeriac before but it’s not something I’ve cooked myself or even thought about to any length. As an alternative to toast, Bron made me celeriac mash as the base for her shirred eggs this morning for breakfast. It was delicious. The celeriac mash had a lovely flavour and absorbed nicely the soft runny yolk from the eggs baked in butter.

In the context of my low carbohydrate way of living, celeriac is a good option. It sits somewhere between cauliflower and potato so that now I’m in the ongoing weight loss (OWL) phase celeriac will help keep variety in my diet. While wombok and cabbage is similar to cauliflower, you can only eat so much wombok and cabbage 🙂

For lunch I made myself some shirred eggs with bacon.

Shirred eggs with bacon and butter

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • Fresh free range eggs (because you know, I don’t want to contribute to cruelty to chooks)
  • Streaky bacon (because lean bacon is by definition not a sane option)
  • Butter (don’t use margarine or oil) with heavy cream as an alternative
  • Parmesan cheese (grated) or any other hard cheese that melts well
  • Dried mixed herbs, salt and pepper

Method

  1. Butter the inside of a small ramekin or bowl
  2. Layer the bacon on the bottom
  3. Place in an oven at 180 °C for 5 minutes
  4. Add a knob of butter and allow to melt
  5. Add two eggs
  6. Place in the oven at 180 °C for 3 minutes
  7. Add the grated Parmesan and mixed dried herbs
  8. Place under a hot grill for 2 minutes
  9. Don’t forget to capture images at the end of each step
  10. Capture a macro image of the finished dish
  11. Allow to cool slightly and spoon onto a plate
  12. Capture another image
  13. Eat the shirred eggs and bacon
  14. Clean up the dishes
  15. Process the images

It's important to butter the dish ;-)

It’s important to butter the dish 😉

Layer the streaky bacon on the bottom of the dish

Layer the streaky bacon on the bottom of the dish

Bring the eggs out and then add some cheese

Bring the eggs out and then add some cheese

I recently disposed of my toaster and today replaced it with this toaster oven

I recently disposed of my toaster and today replaced it with this toaster oven

A close up macro image of the finished product, viz., shirred eggs and bacon

A close up macro image of the finished product, viz., shirred eggs and bacon

Shirred eggs and bacon plated up, yes I know I should have had some sort of salad leaves with it

Shirred eggs and bacon plated up, yes I know I should have had some sort of salad leaves with it

This is the image I posted to Instagram

This is the image I posted to Instagram

For my dinner I wanted to make some of Bron’s celeriac mash. After breakfast she cut off a big wedge for me to try. What I didn’t realise was that celeriac is the root of celery.

The recipe Bron used is a Gordon Ramsay adaptation.

Celeriac mash

  • Servings: 1
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients

  • celeriac
  • olive oil
  • dried mixed herbs
  • garlic powder
  • smoked paprika

Method

  1. Peel the celeriac
  2. Dice the celeriac
  3. Heat the olive oil in a frying or saucepan
  4. Add the celeriac and cook until golden
  5. Season with salt and pepper
  6. Stir in the dried mixed herbs, garlic powder and smoked paprika
  7. Add enough water to nearly cover the celeriac
  8. Reduce the heat
  9. Partially cover the pan
  10. Leave to simmer for 25–30 minutes
  11. Drain remaining water
  12. Lightly crush with a potato masher
  13. Finish with a glug of cream cheese
  14. Season to taste

I enjoyed my celeriac mash with my left over chicken casserole for tea.

Left over chicken casserole with celeriac mash

Left over chicken casserole with celeriac mash

A close up on the celeriac mash. It tasted pretty good.

A close up on the celeriac mash. It tasted pretty good.

Here is some CHO information to think about. Celeriac 9 g CHO per 100 g. Cauliflower 5 g CHO per 100 g. Potato 17 g CHO per 100 g. Cabbage 6 g CHO per 100 g. Pumpkin 6 g CHO per 100 g. Sweet potato 20 g CHO per 100 g

I’m grateful to Bron for introducing me to two new flavour sensations which fit in with my low carbohydrate way of life.

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Hope you had a great weekend and ate YUMMY

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2 thoughts on “What do shirred eggs and celeriac have in common?

  1. Celeriac is a favourite and such an underrated vegetable. I’ve not tried shirred eggs.

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